Becoming competent at assigning competencies

Sudhir Krishnan

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5 thoughts on “competence”

  1. To help trainees understand the competencies get them to teach them to you at a tutorial early on in their time with you.

  2. To validate a competency the trainee doesn’t need to be ‘competent’ in the area but needs to have adequately reflected to demonstrate some competence or movement towards competence

    Useful to discuss the harder competencies and how to help the trainee reach them

  3. Don’t forget to go into detail about the difficult competencies. The four difficult ones are…
    Managing Medical Complexity (includes promoting health)
    Community Orientation (which is about THE COMMUNITY – what things can they do for the community at large as a result of the encounter with a single patient. Includes provision of community services).
    Practising Ethically (discuss and relate things to ethical frameworks)
    Fitness to Practise (which is really about the trainee. It is not about them proving they are fit! But rather that they recognise when things go off track and try to get things back on track – for example, if they are stressed, or recognise underperformance in self or others).

    When assigning a competency, it has to be a deep and meaningful reflection – not just a passing superficial comment.
    If you validate competencies like this, then when it comes to the ESR and the rating scales – you can then be confident knowing any ‘tagged evidence’ for say “managing medical complexity” is going to be a good demonstration of that competency rather than a crappy one.

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